A total solar eclipse

On August 21, 2017, the sun, the moon, and the earth will perfectly align. When this happens, a tiny pathway across the United States will be left in the dark side of the moon's shadow, creating an incredible cosmic phenomenon for us to experience: A Total Solar Eclipse.

SolFest has a one-of-a-kind viewing site picked out for you: open sky, no air pollution, directly on the centerline, and the kicker, one of the longest locations for totality in the entire nation.

 

Starting in Oregon, this total solar eclipse will make its way through only 14 states in the USA, and our beautiful Nebraska is one of the fourteen.

Fortunately for us, Nebraska dominates the rest of the country in the amount of land you can see the total solar eclipse, with 468.4 miles in the path of visibility. 

So why should you care about this solar eclipse? What makes this solar eclipse so much better than all the other ones you have heard about or seen?

Two reasons: Rarity and Totality.


Don't forget.

Suns out, shades out. 

Looking at the sun without proper protection will severely damage your eyes. Only during totality, can you take off your solar eclipse glasses.


R A R I T Y   &   T O T A L I T Y

You may be reading this thinking, "I'm pretty certain I saw a solar eclipse recently, so how can this one be considered "rare?" 

Well, the simple answer to that question is that you probably have not seen a total solar eclipse. 

There are many different types of eclipses: total solar, partial solar, annular, and lunar are just a few. To give you a little summary, partial and lunar eclipses are both pretty common, and you have likely seen one or both of them at some point in your life. Annular eclipses are not as common, as you would have to use special filters in order to see it happening, but they are still more common than the rare and incredible, total solar eclipse.

“If you only think you saw a total eclipse, I promise you - you didn’t.”
— Jim Rosenstock

Total solar eclipses are incredibly rare,  incredibly beautiful, and can be compared to none. If you have the fortune of being able to see a total solar eclipse, you will undergo a life-changing experience, as you will witness the sky darken, stars emerging, and a 360-degree sunset in the middle of the afternoon. You will be able to see a perspective of the earth and the moon you've never been able to experience before, and you most likely will never be able to experience again.

The last total solar eclipse to touch US soil was in 1991, and that was in Hawaii. Before that, the last total solar eclipse to be seen from the continental US was in 1979, and the only states within the visibility path were Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and North Dakota. So, the last time Nebraska was able to see a total solar eclipse was in 1954, and even then, it was only the very northern part of Nebraska with visibility. 

Needless to say, unless you intentionally traveled to see one, odds are, you haven't seen one. 


In Hastings, Nebraska, we are directly in the path of the August 21, 2017 Total Solar Eclipse, and we want YOU to come experience the most incredible 2 minutes and 14 seconds of your life with us. 

If you take a look at the picture right below, you will see a map of Nebraska with a shadowed path passing through it. Those red lines and the shadowed area between them represent all the areas that will be able to see this total solar eclipse. Now, that blue line represents the actual path of the sun.

Hastings, Nebraska is in the perfect location, as the 2017 total solar eclipse will pass directly through our community, leaving us in awe of its cosmic beauty.


 

 Join us. Join us to watch the awe-inspiring 2017 Total Solar Eclipse.

Join SOLFEST 2017.